In the wettest place on Earth – Meghalaya in North West India they use the roots of live trees to make bridges.

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Meghalaya: The Wettest Place on Earth AUG 22, 2014

Photographer Amos Chapple took these amazing images in  the state of Meghalaya, India, reportedly the rainiest spot on Earth. The village of Mawsynram in Meghalaya receives 467 inches of rain per year. Laborers who work outdoors often wear full-body umbrellas made from bamboo and banana leaf. One of the most fascinating and beautiful features in the region are the “living bridges” spanning rain-soaked valleys. For centuries, locals have been training the roots of rubber trees to grow into natural bridges, far outlasting man-made wooden structures that rot in just a few years. The bridges are self-strengthening, becoming more substantial over time, as the root systems grow.

In a scene played out every weekday morning, students of the RCLP School in Nongsohphan Village, Meghalaya, India, cross a bridge grown from the roots of a rubber tree. In the relentless damp of Meghalaya's jungles, wooden structures rot away too quickly to be practical. For centuries the Khasi people have instead used the trainable roots of rubber trees to "grow" bridges over the region's rivers.
In a scene played out every weekday morning, students of the RCLP School in Nongsohphan Village, Meghalaya, India, cross a bridge grown from the roots of a rubber tree. In the relentless damp of Meghalaya’s jungles, wooden structures rot away too quickly to be practical. For centuries the Khasi people have instead used the trainable roots of rubber trees to “grow” bridges over the region’s rivers.
Three laborers walk into Mawsynram under the traditional Khasi umbrellas known as knups. Made from bamboo and banana leaf, the knups are favored for allowing two-handed work, and for being able to stand up to the high winds which lash the region during heavy rainstorms.
Three laborers walk into Mawsynram under the traditional Khasi umbrellas known as knups. Made from bamboo and banana leaf, the knups are favored for allowing two-handed work, and for being able to stand up to the high winds which lash the region during heavy rainstorms.
Examples of the of thin aerial roots which locals have knotted into place to manipulate rubber trees into bridges and ladders which can stand up to the rain-soaked environment of Meghalaya
Examples of the of thin aerial roots which locals have knotted into place to manipulate rubber trees into bridges and ladders which can stand up to the rain-soaked environment of Meghalaya
A local guide demonstrates a tree root bridge being developed to replace an older, circuitous route across a gorge deep in the jungle near Mawsynram
A local guide demonstrates a tree root bridge being developed to replace an older, circuitous route across a gorge deep in the jungle near Mawsynram
In the valley beneath Mawsynram, the village of Nongriat maintains the best-known example of the "living bridges" which have been used for centuries in the region.
In the valley beneath Mawsynram, the village of Nongriat maintains the best-known example of the “living bridges” which have been used for centuries in the region.

Original Article

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